[1] Kathy Ormosi, “The Abraham Staats House,” Garden State Legacy.com, Issue 1, September 2008.

[2] The discussion of changes in land ownership of the South Bound Brook property that will become the Abraham Staats farm is taken from Ancestry.com. Pre-Revolutionary Dutch houses and families in northern New Jersey and southern New York [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. Original data: Rosalie Fellows Bailey, Pre-Revolutionary Dutch houses and families in northern New Jersey and southern New York. New York: W. Morrow & Co., 1936, pp. 450-452.

[3] The Staats family name was not adopted until after 1664 when the English took over New Netherlands and introduced the use of English surnames. The earlier patronymic system used by the Dutch involved the addition of the suffix “se” or “sen” to the male child’s first name. Jan Pieters was literally Jan, son of Pieter. Similarly his son was Pieter Jansen, Pieter, son of Jan, and his son, Pieter Pietersen, was Pieter, son of Pieter. Pieter Pietersen and Pieter Jansen subsequently adopted the last name of Staats, particularly on legal documents such as the 1687 Oath of Allegiance.

[4] All three Staats attended the Harlingen Dutch Reformed Church by the mid-1740s. The genealogical information provided about the early Staats family comes from Richard W. Cook, “The Staats Family,” and Lewis D. Cook, “The Family of John Staats of Hillsborough Township,” both appearing in Ancestry.com, Genealogies of New Jersey Families, From the Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey, Provo: Utah, Ancestry.com Operations, original publication, Genealogies of New Jersey Families, From the Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey, Selected and Introduced by Joseph R. Klett, vol. !, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996, pp. 818-826

[5] HSR, IV-4.

[6] Genealogies of New Jersey Families…,p. 813.

[7] It would be useful to have someone locate the original deed to John’s farm in Hillsborough. Did Peter Staats purchase this property for John following his marriage, just as he gave the Bound Brook farm to Hendrick?

[8] There is no explanation for the very high purchase price John paid to Hendrick.

[9] Family legend says that Abraham and 3 other Bound Brook residents were specifically excluded from the pardon and declared “arch traitors” in Lord Howe’s offer. This is not the case. No one was described as an arch traitor or specifically excluded. The use of the term arch traitor appears for the first time in Frank P. Snell, History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties, New Jersey, (Philadelphia, Everts & Peck, 1881), p. 649.

[10] HSR, IV:5. Abraham filed a claim for these losses in 1782 when he served as one of three state appointed appraisers for Somerset County. Although claims were filed throughout New Jersey, the state never approved compensation for the loses. Acts of the Council and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey…, compiled by Peter Wilson, A.M., Trenton, NJ, 1784, pp.237-238. “Revolutionary War Damage Claims, 1776-1782” New Jersey State Archives.

[11] Google Books.com, Benson J. Lossing, The Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution…, 2 vols, [reprint, 1850 ed.], Gretna: Pelican Publishing Company, 2008, I:333.

[12] Abraham and Margaret also lost two daughters, Catherine (1778-1779) and Magdalene (1789-1790).

[13] Tax records from 1788, 1791 and 1806 show 1-2 slaves as part of the taxable household. HSR, IV:6.

[14] John Staats’ will gave Abraham the “farm near Bound Brook where he lives, of 271 acres.” He also gave Abraham’s brother, Peter the “farm at Millstone, where he lives, of 300 acres,” and brother Rynier “farm where I live of 300 acres.” This is typical of the Dutch tradition of partible inheritance when all male children receive roughly comparable property and daughters generally received cash of equal value. Abstract of will of John Staats, Hillsborough Township. Ancestry.com. New Jersey, Abstracts of Wills, 1670-1817 [database on-line]. Provo, UT

[15] Ancestry.com, Minutes of the meetings of the justices and chosen freeholders from Somerset County, May 13, 1772 to September 2, 1822, [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. May 10, 1775, p. 9; May 1781, p. 33.

[16] Ancestry.com, Minutes of the meetings of the justices and chosen freeholders from Somerset County, May 13, 1772 to September 2, 1822, [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005, passim.

[17] “1 Bed & Beding with apparel in the Parler £11.0.0” “the Bed & Beding with the apparel in the Dwelling Room £8.0.0,” Inventory, John Van Derveer, Millstone, March 25, 1771, New Jersey Archives, 403R, Trenton, NJ. “1 Feather Bed Curtains Rug Blankets with all the Bed Cloaths thereunto belonging, in the said Front Room £12.0.0” “1 Feather Bed, Bedstead Curtains & all the Bed Cloaths thereunto belonging in said (Parlor) £15.0.0” Inventory, Rem Ditmarse, Millstone, August 7, 1775, NJ Archives, 470R. “the bed and beding and furniture in the first Room £20.10.0,” The bed and beding in the 2d Room £6.0.0,” “the bed and furniture in the 3d Room £5.0.0,” “the bed and furniture in the forth Room £7.0.0” Inventory, Ebenezer Timbley, 1784/1785, NJ Archives, 772R. “No. 1 Feather Bed and furniture, Standing in the East Front Room £18.0.0,” No. 2 Feather bed & furniture in East back room £12.0.0, No 3. [Feather bed & furniture in East back room £4.0.0,” “No. 4 Feather Bed & furniture in the back west room £17.0.0,” “No. 5 feather bed & furniture [in the front west room] £10.0.0,” Inventory, Mikel Blau Sr., January 23, 1786, NJ Archives, 778.

[18] Probate Records and Indexes, 1794-1972; Author: New Jersey. Surrogate’s Court (Somerset County); Probate Place: Somerset, New Jersey. Ancestry.com. New Jersey. Wills and Probate Records. 1739-1991 [database on-line]. Provo,UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original Data: New Jersey County, District and Probate Courts. Hereafter referred to as Probate Records, 1794-1945, Ancestry.com. [Hereafter referred to as Probate Records and Indexes.] [19] Ancestry.com. New Jersey, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1643-1890 [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 1999.

[20] Records in Staats Family Bible, recorded by Sarah Staats Bayles. “Bible and Family Records of Abraham and Margaret (DuBois) Staats, from New Testament published at Amsterdam, 1757” in Genealogies of New Jersey Families: From the Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey, vol. I, selected and introduced by Joseph R. Klett, pp. 825-826. Books.google.com.

[21] The fifth unmarried daughter, Margaret Staats, died November 10, 1821, prior to the death of Margaret DuBois Staats April 22, 1822. In her will Margaret left her share of the lands from her father’s estate and her “furniture beds and bedding” to her four sisters in equal share. Her $300 inheritance was divided equally among her brother and sisters. Once again Sarah Staats’ share from Margaret was to be held in trust by her executor to protect it from William Bayles. She named Isaac Staats and J. W. Frelinghuysen executors.

[22] These are the appraised values given on Abraham Staats’ 1821 estate inventory. Abraham Staats Estate Accounts, January 5, 1822, Probate Records and Indexes.

[23] The manumissions appear in http://www.onentofl.com/chmanusomernj.html.

[24] Court of Errors & Appeals, June Term, 1853, George B. Halstead, Reports of Cases Determined in the Court of Chancery, and in the Prerogative Court, and, on Appeal, in the Courts of Errors and Appeals, of the State of New Jersey, vol. I, 2nd ed., Newark, NJ: Soney & Sage, 1899, pp. 814-885. [Hereafter referred to as Freeman versus Staats.] [25] The deed for the sale to the Delaware and Raritan Canal Company is referenced in Appendix A: Deed and Will Research, Michael J. Gall and Richard F. Veit, “The Abraham Staats Family: A Reflection on the Trials and Tribulations of a Dutch-American Family in South Bound Brook, New Jersey” May 15, 2009, p. A-3. Abraham Staats House. HSR, First Floor Plan, shows a small sketch of the presumed c. 1836 expansion of the east addition.

[26] The 1840 census indicates that one person in Phebe’s household was employed in agriculture.

[27] Freeman versus Staats.

[28] Freeman versus Staats.

[29] GoogleBooks.com. George B. Halstead, Reports of Cases Determined in the Court of Chancery, and in the Prerogative Court, and, on Appeal, in the Courts of Errors and Appeals, of the State of New Jersey, vol. I, 2nd ed., Newark, NJ: Soney & Sage, 1899, 513-516.

[30] William Bayles appears as a witness for Isaac Staats in the suit against Reuben and Margaret Freeman. His testimony includes accounts of drinking with Isaac. Freeman versus Staats.

[31] National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Washington, DC: Non-population Census Schedules for New Jersey, 1850-1880: Mortality: Archive Collection: M1810: Archive Roll Number: 1; Census Year: 1859; Census Place: Franklin, Somerset, New Jersey. Ancestry.com. U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1885 [database on-line], Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

[32] Details of Mary Smith Staats’ will appear in Gall and Veit, The Abraham Staats Family…, A:9-10. The wills of Phebe Staats and Sarah Bayles appear in Probate Records and Indexes.

[33] GoogleBooks. Com, Gustav Kobbe, The Central Railroad of New Jersey: An Illustrated Guide-Book, with Road Maps, 1890, pp. 64-65.

[34] Files of the Abraham Staats House.

[35] Property Sale Brochure, Baron Von Steuben Farm. South Bound Brook, c. 1936-1938, Collections of the Abraham Staats House.